The Inner Workings Of The Ferrari 330 GT

What’s more interesting than working on a Ferrari 330 GT? Why sharing all the in and outs of our progress on the project with you folks! Seriously, how often do you get to see the inner workings of these rare cars? To that end we’ve made a couple of videos just to show you what this awesome Ferrari 330 GT looks like, on the inside.

We document everything.

We photograph and film or document everything, each step of the way. We do this for our own information of course, but also for our client who receives a copy of everything we generate during the restoration. This particular video is a quick look at the disassembling of the crank. You’ll also see the main crank caps, cylinder heads with valves  and of course piston and rods.  After all that the block then needs to be restored to it’s former glorious luster. The initial cleaning of the engine block surface is what you’re seeing as the video closes. Hope you find it as interesting as we did! We have other videos and you can watch them all on our.. Drum roll please,

Italtech GT Channel!

Okay.., sheepish grin, although we have plenty of video in clips, we’ve only just begun putting them together for You Tube. As you can see we clearly are “amateur status” when it comes to film making. But we have 3 videos to show so far, and we are planning to create a lot more. Hopefully they’ll get better with practice.

 

Ferrari 330 Engine Block Photo

Ferrari 330 GT Engine Block

Here is the end result of a lot of hard work done on the 330. Block, crank studs, all back together and engine in show ready condition waiting to be reinstalled back into the 330.  Stay tuned..

 

 

 

 

 

 

As told to me by Massimo Mondino:

Mind The Gap!

Mind The Gap! Click To Englarge

Recently we got in a 1964 Ferrari 330 that came from another shop where it was restored. It was suffering from a lack of performance; not performing the way it’s suppose to.., close to it, but just not quite there. So I began to search for the cause. What was holding this engine back?

After checking the distributors making sure the points dwell was right and also that the points were synchronized on my distributor machine, I moved forward to check the spark plug wires. I did a compression test and a leak down finding uneven cylinders. So I went ahead and did a valve adjustment, I found that the valves were too tight. After putting everything back together I set the timing to proper specifications and also removed the top of the carburetors and checked the the floats. I found that the floats were completely out of adjustment. I went ahead and set them to the right specs as well. After everything was reassembled I went for a test drive. Although the car improved a bit it still wasn’t performing as I expected it to. So at that point I decided to remove the carburetors because although they did look like they were (new) fully rebuilt, after finding the other miscellaneous problems on the car, I just had the feeling that something was still wrong between the carbs and the intake, maybe an uneven carburetor base, or too much free play in the shafts which I know from experience, that in the DCZs are a common problem. I went ahead and removed the carburetors completely placing them upside down on the bench, I checked one carburetor at a time for free play on the shaft and using a straight edge, checked the carburetor base to see if it was warped. When I got to the number 3 carburetor I noticed that when I would fully open the throttle the secondary shaft driven by gear, was loose and intermittently, would only open partially and when it did it was never the same. It would open every time at a different degree/angle. Basically the car was running with 12 cylinders and sometimes only with 10 and some. A simple loose clamp was the culprit that created this extremely frustrating, time consuming and hard to find problem.

Moral of the story? In my line of business when it comes down to particular repairs, like a carburetor rebuild, you make sure that when you start putting it together you finish the job, you don’t walk away in the middle of it. It is too easy to forget a really important technicality. Attention to detail is essential in this business. The clamps forgotten by the last mechanic, not only affected the performance of the car but caused concerns for both the customer (prompting them to take it to another shop) and for me, in trying to track down the problem they left behind.”

Ferrari Water Pump Shaft and Gear

Ferrari Water Pump Shaft and Gear

(This is a reprint from my first blog, Sept 2007, of one of Massimo’s most memorable Ferrari stories and one of my favorites as well since I was around and actually saw what had happened, it was fascinating and I thought it was time for a re-share.)

MIA or Missing In Action

A client came in with a blown head gasket due to over heating, on a 1985 308 4 valve Ferrari. Massimo pulled the engine out, pulled the heads off, replaced the head gasket and thermostat. He than checked the water pump and looked through the water pump housing pipe as well, everything appeared fine, no leaks..,

So why had it overheated?

Massimo is meticulous and always double checks everything. And on a hunch, he pulled the water pump cover, but again no obvious reason for the trouble, the shaft had no play on the bearing, seals looked recently done, no problems right?

Wrong.

When he tried to turn the shaft by hand the shaft would spin without consistently engaging the gear. In other words the shaft is supposed to be locked onto the gear so that it doesn’t move at all! First thing he thought of was that the Woodruff key notch, a piece that sits on the key and fits into a spot on the gear wheel, was completely worn out. But when he pulled the front engine cover off and saw the gear bouncing on the shaft he was intrigued.

Moving? He thought, this thing wasn’t suppose to be moving around at all!

After getting down to the Woodruf key itself he saw clearly that there was no notch at all! As you can see in the photo there is nothing attached to the shaft! Instead, the Woodruff key had been pressed in. It is very likely that the shaft came like that from the factory, hard to tell, but because the notch wasn’t milled onto the shaft, the water pump circulated sporadically, which in turn caused over heating and finally catastrophic failure.

So Massimo replaced the water pump shaft and the problem was solved.
But he later confided to me that this was really strange and he’d never seen anything like this in all of his years working.

We got up early this morning to attend the Cars and Coffee in Alisa Viejo, and boy was it a blast! We brought a Ferrari work in progress to show, but were surprised that almost every vehicle imagined was represented, from Fiat 500 to Rolls Royce! People were laid back and friendly as they sipped coffee and chatted about of course, cars, theirs and others. All the makes and models presented a perfect photo opportunity so we snapped quite a few shots; a riot of color and shape. We’ve uploaded what we saw, including our artistic attempts, so you could see them too! We love Cars and Coffee event in Aliso Viejo, (and anywhere else for that matter,) what a seriously cool way to spend a leisurely Saturday morning!